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ABOUT THIS BLOG

In the summer of 2009, Nicolas Rapp decided to take a break from his Art Director job at The Associated Press to attempt a one-year overland travel around the world in a 1996 Toyota Land Cruiser. He was back in New York in February 2011 after traveling 15 months and 37,000 miles.

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  • Hundred of miles across the desert to Lima

    Posted on February 19th, 2010 Sergio No comments
    Driving to Playa Tortugas

    Driving to Playa Tortugas

    In the evening, after cooking a pasta diner with some squid, we went out on the beach to see some traditional Peruvian dancing. At midnight we were in bed, and stayed around until 1 p.m., to take advantage of the beach. In the afternoon, we would go to Trujillo, and we knew it would be harder to find a good spot to camp in the more populated area. I did quick a interview for a Los Angeles radio show and we left to cover the 200-miles to the city.

    01_market

    Getting supplies at a market close to the Pacific Ocean

    On our way out, we stopped at a market to buy fish and vegetables and got back to the Pan-American. I am so surprised by Northern Peru. Little did I know that we would be traveling through the sand desert until Lima. Here and there, there are some artificially irrigated areas, but often, you will go 70-miles before seeing a town or hamlet. It is also a large country, and I imagined being in Lima earlier than we would be. It now looks like Dan will leave us in Cuzco to go back to work.

    Quick stop in the desert, on our way to Trujillo

    Quick stop in the desert, on our way to Trujillo

    And there is also a larger distance between gas stations we see. Now, we try to refuel each time there is 95-octane gasoline available, which is not that often.

    Trujillo

    Trujillo

    We stopped in Huanchaco, a town few miles outside of Trujillo. As I was working on uploading pictures to my website, I was surprised to ear screams behind me. When I turned, I saw the French guys we have been spending time with in Colombia. They just arrived at the same spot than us and saw me at once. It was great to see them again. Traveling with more people and several vehicles is always safer and more comfortable.

    Buying ice cream on the way south

    Buying ice cream on the way south

    We quickly agreed we would need some drinks to celebrate the event of having found each other, and soon we were having beers and eating ceviche (again). We decided to stick together for few days on our way south, and split before Lima, where they didn’t intend to spend time. With the kids, they travel at a slower pace than we do, since every afternoon they have to do homework. If you see families traveling for a long time in remote region, chances are that they are French. This is the only country at my knowledge that allows kids to not go to school for years, as long as they follow the governmental learning path, and send homework every few days by email.

    Chan Chan

    Chan Chan

    We stayed Huanchaco for two nights, and camped on the beach. We spent the daytime visiting the Trujillo historical center, doing groceries, and checking out Chan Chan, the largest pre-Colombian city in South America, constructed of adobe brick and covered with carved surface. The huge city of 10,000 dwellings was built around AD 850.

    Chan Chan

    Chan Chan

    Back on the road, we decided to drive and do an overnight stop in Tortugas, a small town in the desert, bordered by the Pacific Ocean.

    More desert

    More desert

    We gathered it was worth seeing it by a Peruvian barman we met in Playa Rochas. He was saying it was the most beautiful beach of the whole country.

    Looking for a spot along the beach

    Looking for a spot along the beach

    And indeed, we did find there the nicest place we saw so far in Peru. North of the fishing town was another bay, completely empty outside of a small fishing process plant. The site was gorgeous, huge and empty.

    Tortugas bay

    Tortugas bay

    We parked the trucks in a way I was protected from the wind, made a fire and opened a bottle of rum. What can I say, there’s not much more you can ask when you get this beautiful place for yourself.

    Ready for the night

    Ready for the night

    In the morning, Felix, one of our companions, cut my hair, as the US$1.50 haircut I got in Nicaragua was far behind, and the beatnik look is not necessary the best way to cross borders.

    Leaving in the morning

    Leaving in the morning

    Then we said good-bye again to the rest of the convoy, and the three of us were gone to Lima, a bit less than 300-miles away. Again, we crossed huge sand deserts.

    Mountains seem to be covered with snow, which end up to be pale sand

    Mountains seem to be covered with snow, which end up to be pale sand

    It is a pleasant drive, as long stretch are quite relaxing, unlike Lima which would be a giant automobile chocked metropolis.

    Entering Lima

    Entering Lima

    *Sergio is posting for Nick, who’s having trouble to access the internet.

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6 Responses to “Hundred of miles across the desert to Lima”

  1. Nick – really enjoying your journey and the pictures. Sounds like you have hit your stride and are making great progress. In reference to your comment about being allowed to take years off of school, the US permits any parent to homeschool instead of placing their children in a formal school. I think Americans are just a little more nervous about taking the kind of trip you are on, especially with kids. I often read of couples from the US doing homeschool aboard sailing ships in the Caribbean or South Pacific.

  2. Harvey (Naples,FL)

    Nick,

    This is the trip we were all waiting to follow! It’s so exciting to see all the different stops and the lay of the land that follows. With Dan leaving so soon… it almost seemed like you picked up a hitchhiker and now are dropping him off at his destination.

    Pix are GREAT and so are your descriptions….

    Cheers,
    Harvey

  3. Yo buddyt hope all is well and looks like it is. Good to see bumped into your french friends again. Dont know If you check you pay pal -helped out. God gless my friends. Karey

  4. I love the scale of the photos – it’s hard to comprehend how big and varied our planet is, but you are showing us! Drive safe!

  5. Still checking in on you all the time and always glad to find you safe and well. Hope you have only more good thigs on the road ahead. Glad someone else mentioned US homeschooling — many people do it, but maybe not hit the road while doing it. Best wishes!

  6. Just checking and saying “Hello!” NY misses you and your jokes. 🙂